Extreme Sports Athletes Could End Summer with Traumatic Brain Injuries

By: - July 15, 2016

Helmets aren't cool. It's hard to convince athletes in individual sports, whether it be X Game events like skateboarding or trying to ride on the back of the bull, it's hard for people to get head protection. And Colorado TBI attorneys can attest to the fact that this aversion is leading to a rising trend in both identification and diagnoses of concussion and other brain injuries. So, what to do this summer?

The Problem with Statistics of Traumatic Brain Injuries
There are few sanctioning bodies involved in riding bikes down mountains or taking a shot at riding a wakeboard so it can sometimes be difficult to track injuries because of the lack centralization. Still, a report from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons show that one in ten injuries involved the head and neck. Skateboarders, skiers and snowboarders each have roughly 100,000 injuries per year.

The latter two are unlikely to occur during the summer but BMX and others are. It's why the story earlier this spring about ex-star Dave Mirra was so sad. Some authorities suggest that he killed himself because of early-onset dementia possibly associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The condition arises from repeated concussions and trauma to the head and has been in the news regarding NFL concussion lawsuits.

What to Do? The "Lame" Thing
One Michigander wrote about how she helps other skiers after suffering a brain injury herself. Thanks to more awareness about the risks of concussions (including data suggesting damage can still occur up to six months after the initial trauma), helmets are still losing their stigma. Still, if people are interested in getting on the water and doing McTwists on a wakeboard or skiing this fall, going up in the air without a helmet presents major risks.


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Even with that, expect to hear stories like one about a female motocross rider who suffered a major brain injury. Left unable to talk or even walk, she took nearly a year to fully recover. While extreme sports necessarily will include risks, there needs to be more information about the rate of accidents that can lead to traumatic brain injury.

So it may not be that helmets look cool. On the other hand, neither do tombstones or cracked skulls. Trying to choose between the two may become a lot easier in the years ahead.

Getting Help with Your Colorado Traumatic Brain Injury Case
If you've been in an accident, your injuries could be significant. Medical bills might pile up and lost income could make bills tough to pay. Learn more about your legal rights: Get a free consultation with an Anderson Hemmat & McQuinn TBI attorney today.

Call 303-782- 999 or use the easy case evaluation form to your right for a confidential review of the facts of your potential case. We look forward to helping you get the best possible outcome.

Free Personal Injury Case Evaluation

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